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0 Thailand loses bid to join UN rights body



Nearly 5 months since its military declared martial rule, Thailand fails to win a seat at the UN Human Rights Council
Prayuth Jan-ocha, Junta leader and now the Prime Minister of Thailand
UNITED NATIONS – Junta-ruled Thailand lost its controversial bid to join the top United Nations body in charge of promoting and protecting human rights.
Thailand was among 5 Asian countries that vied for seats on the UN Human Rights Council but got the least number of votes compared to India, Indonesia, Bangladesh and Qatar.
The UN General Assembly elected 15 new members of the 47-member Council on Tuesday, October 21, at the UN Headquarters here in New York. The new members will serve a 3-year term starting on January 1, 2015.
With only 4 Asian seats available, Qatar edged out Thailand with 142 votes compared to Bangkok’s 136. India got the most votes with 162, Indonesia with 152, and Bangladesh with 149.
A majority of 97 votes was the minimum requirement. The UN has 193 member states.
Ahead of the elections, human rights groups pressed Thailand to improve its human rights record by lifting martial law, ending censorship, and ceasing arbitrary and secret detention.
The New York-based Human Rights Watch, the Paris-based International Federation for Human Rights, and the Bangkok-based Union for Civil Liberty all called on the Thai government to end martial rule to be a “credible and influential member” of the Council.
Martial law has been in place in Thailand for nearly 5 months since the military grabbed power from the government in a May 22 coup.
At the UN General Debate in September, Foreign Minister General Tanasak Patimapragorn justified the coup as necessary because the opposing political parties were “unwilling to compromise for the sake of the country” and caused a political impasse.
In a letter to Thai Prime Minister General Prayuth Chan-ocha on October 18, Human Rights Watch said Thailand’s pledges to promote human rights cannot be taken seriously so long as the country is under “abusive military rule.”
“Thailand’s declarations supporting rights without action to revoke military law and end the repression of speech, association, and peaceful protest will be easily ignored,” said Human Rights Watch Asia director Brad Adams.
Human rights groups pointed out that the junta ordered the media not to criticize the military, censored critical stories, and banned public gatherings of more than 5 people.
Rights activists also noted that the junta even arrested protesters who peacefully expressed dissent by showing a 3-finger Hunger Games-inspired salute, and read George Orwell’s 1984 novel in public, or played the French national anthem “La Marseillaise.”
Based in Geneva, Switzerland, the UN Human Rights Council addresses human rights violations and makes recommendations on them. It discusses thematic human rights issues, reviews countries’ rights records, and acts on complaints.
Members are elected to a 3-year term, and are not eligible for re-election after two consecutive terms.
India, Indonesia re-elected
India and Indonesia won their bids for re-election. The Philippines got one vote, even if it did not campaign for re-election. Manila is already a member of the Council and will end its term this year.
In its campaign, Indonesia pledged to promote religious freedom and tolerance as the world’s third largest democracy, and the biggest Muslim-majority nation. Jakarta is also a key player in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).
“Indonesia is living proof that democracy and Islam can coexist peacefully, harmoniously and productively. Indonesia also continues to actively promote genuine dialogue to advance human rights causes,” Indonesia said in a note verbale to the UN General Assembly.
Indonesia cited its initiatives in the region including the Bali Democracy Forum, the Asia-Pacific Regional Interfaith Dialogues, the International Conference of Islamic Scholars and the New Asian-African Strategic Partnership Ministerial Conference on Capacity-Building for Palestine.
Yet human rights groups have also expressed concern about Indonesia’s rights record, drawing attention to growing violence and discrimination against religious minorities, local decrees that violate women’s rights, corruption, and mistreatment of refugees and migrants.
Qatar has also not escaped criticism.
UN Watch, an observer NGO at the Council, said Qatar poorly treated migrant workers, denies basic rights to women like being elected to the Shura legislative council, and allegedly finances terrorist groups like the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and Hamas.
This is not the first time countries with questionable human rights records were elected to the Council. In the past, nations like Cuba, Saudi Arabia, China and Russia won seats to the body.
Costa Rica also loses polls
Besides Thailand, Costa Rica was the other candidate that lost a seat but for the Latin America and Caribbean States group.
The other regional groups agreed on their candidates, presenting a so-called “clean state.”
The 15 new members of the Council are:

  1. Albania
  2. Bangladesh
  3. Bolivia
  4. Botswana
  5. Congo
  6. El Salvador
  7. Ghana
  8. India
  9. Indonesia
  10. Latvia
  11. Netherlands
  12. Nigeria
  13. Paraguay
  14. Portugal
  15. Qatar                     Thabks to  Rapler   ...Rappler multimedia reporter Ayee Macaraig is a 2014 fellow of the Dag Hammarskjöld Fund for Journalists. She is in New York to cover the UN General Assembly, foreign policy, diplomacy, and world events
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0 Thailand's war-weary southerners fear coup will erode new freedoms



Article from Reuters
BY ANDREW R.C. MARSHALL
They talked about corruption and politics, about healthcare and women's rights, about the anxiety of bringing up children in a corner of Thailand where war has killed 6,000 people in the last decade.
Then they fell silent.
For years, Media Selatan was one of the most popular community radio stations in Thailand's three southernmost provinces, where Muslim separatists have fought government troops since 2004. But when the Thai military seized power in a May 22 coup, it ordered the closure of thousands of independent stations nationwide - Media Selatan among them.
The Malay-language station - its name means "Southern Media" - was more than a public forum for a war-weary people. It had also come to symbolize a flowering of political expression among the south's Malay-speaking Muslims, who live in a country dominated by Thai-speaking Buddhists, since abortive peace talks last year.
Many southerners now fear the military will use the coup to roll back hard-won freedoms. "It's like closing the eyes and ears of the people," said Wanahmad Wankuejik, director of Media Selatan, of his station's closure.
Civil society groups also voiced concerns that a recent purge of senior officials and the arrival of a hardline military commander could exacerbate what is already one of Southeast Asia's deadliest unresolved conflicts.
On May 24, a rare series of bombings in Pattani's provincial capital, also called Pattani, killed three people, wounded dozens and triggered fears that post-coup violence might soar.
BANGKOK PREOCCUPIED
Annexed by Thailand a century ago, the south has long simmered under the neglectful rule of distant Bangkok. The latest and most serious violence erupted in the early 2000s, with a thousands-strong network of elusive militants battling at least 60,000 soldiers, police and paramilitary forces.
Reports of gunfights, drive-by shootings, beheadings and bombings are near-daily events. Martial law, declared last month in the rest of Thailand, has been in place in Pattani and neighboring Narathiwat and Yala provinces for almost a decade.
Most governments - and most Thais - have been too preoccupied by political unrest elsewhere in their country to pay much attention to the so-called Deep South.
The military staged its May coup after six months of sometimes deadly street protests, the latest flare-up in a 10-year conflict between the Bangkok-based royalist establishment and mostly rural "red-shirt" supporters of ousted premier Yingluck Shinawatra and her brother Thaksin.
Before the crisis erupted, Yingluck's government had last year began peace talks with the insurgent group Barisan Revolusi Nasional (National Revolutionary Front, or BRN) in the Malaysian capital Kuala Lumpur.
The talks soon foundered, but not before fostering an increasingly assertive civil society of activists, journalists, students and lawyers. They have spoken out against human rights abuses and pushed for greater recognition for the Malay language, culture and religion.
REVIVAL OF PEACE TALKS "UNLIKELY"
    Since taking power, the military has carried out what one senior police officer described to Reuters as a "systematic purge" of officials considered loyal to Thaksin or Yingluck.
    One was Thawee Sodsong, the ex-director of the Southern Border Provinces Administration Centre (SBPAC), which oversees civilian administration in the region. Thawee was popular among Malay Muslims for handing out cash to conflict victims and investigating suspected abuses by Thai security forces.
   Just two days after the coup, he was transferred to an inactive post and replaced with Panu Uthairat, a former SBPAC chief with close ties to Thailand's royalist and military establishment.
    Of more concern to civil society groups is Lieutenant General Walit Rojanaphakdee, the new commander of the Fourth Army, which controls southern Thailand. Walit was appointed in a military reshuffle almost two months before the coup.
Like junta chief General Prayuth Chan-ocha, he belongs to the military's "Eastern Tigers" or Queens Guard faction, which was instrumental in both last month's coup and the one in 2006 that removed Thaksin.
In 2010, Walit was wounded - and his aide killed - in an April 10 clash with red-shirt protesters in Bangkok. He then commanded the Second Infantry Division, which played a central role in a military crackdown in which more than 90 people were killed.
Walit was likely to "reinforce the military's current playbook" by boosting intelligence-gathering and launching more frequent raids on insurgent hideouts, said Anthony Davis, a Thailand-based analyst at security consulting firm IHS-Jane's.
Or he could resurrect "more aggressive counter-insurgency methods" last deployed in 2007 and 2008, said Davis. Back then, hundreds of Malay Muslim suspects were detained in large-scale military operations that fueled local grievances but had little long-term impact on the violence.
"Either way, it will not be business as usual," said Davis. The junta was highly unlikely to revive peace talks with BRN insurgents in the coming months, he added.
WINNING HEARTS AND MINDS
Aggressive methods could escalate the conflict beyond the southern region to tourist areas. Hat Yai, the closest major city to the three southernmost provinces at the heart of the conflict, has already endured many deadly bomb attacks. Police on the resort island of Phuket found and disarmed a car-bomb in December.
"Peace talks are still on our agenda," said deputy army spokesman Colonel Weerachon Sukondhapatipak, adding the military government was devising a plan to "bring all stakeholders together".
"We still believe that to solve the problem of the Deep South we must win hearts and minds," he said.
Even so, many journalists and activists are braced for the worst.
A week after the coup, General Walit summoned journalists to his army base and warned them that publishing "negative" stories about the military carried a two-year jail sentence.
Many actions taken by the coupmakers to suppress political dissent in Thailand are grimly familiar to southern Muslims.
In the past month, hundreds of politicians and activists have been detained without charge at army camps, with some undergoing what the authorities call "attitude adjustment".
In the past decade, thousands of Malay Muslims have been detained and sometimes tortured by the military for suspected insurgent links, or forced to attend "re-education" programs.
The army's post-coup campaign to "bring back happiness to the Thai people" by staging festivals elicits groans of recognition in the south, where a bid to win hearts and minds has been undermined by human rights abuses by security forces.

"The military is now using the Pattani model against all Thais," said a Malay-Muslim reporter who, fearing military harassment, requested anonymity. "My friends in Bangkok tell me, 'Now we know what it's like to live there."
(Editing by Alex Richardson)
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/06/17/us-thailand-pattani-insight-idUSKBN0ES2TQ20140617
[Read More...]


0 The Situation of Saiburi Royal Family Escape to take Refuge in Kelantan



Translated from เหตุการณ์กลุ่มราขินิกุลเมืองสายบุรีหนีราขภัยไปเมืองกลันตัน
By  รัศมินทร์ นิติธรรม
มูลนิธิลเล็ก-ประไพ วิริยะพัน (http://lek-prapai.org/index.php)
Tengku Abd.Kadir Kamaruddin Raja of Patani
 After  the dead of Phraya Saiburi Tengku Abdulkadir(Ni-Lamai) King Chulalongkorn or Rama V of Siam (1868 -1910) appointed Ni-Pae son  of Phraya Saiburi((Ni-Lamai) as Phraya-suriya-sunthorn-baworn-phakdee Sri-maharaja Matta-abdulwibul-kobkate-prated-malayu  the governor of Saiburi, appointed Ni-pi younger brother of Phraya Saiburi((Ni-Lamai) as Phra-Ratana-Montri-the assistant governor and Ni-Hitam younger brother of Phra-Ratana-Montri (Ni-pi) as Phra-wiset- wangsa-assistant governor of Saiburi.
When Phraya Saiburi (Ni-Pae) was appointed  the governor of Saiburi, he moved out from Nyiringa(Nyigno)  palace to construct a new palace at Salingdongbayu now situated in  Taluban Su-District , Saiburi district, Pattani province.
After Phraya Saiburi (Ni-Pae) moving out from Nyiringa(Nyigno)  palace and resided at Taluban Salingdongbayu palace, left a huge  Nyirigna people and community  behind with out any leader, the Siamese government then appointed Ni-kuechi(Ni-Kari) from Bumae village(now in village No.1 ,Nyigno district, Narathiwat province) as  Mae-Kong- titled Muen-sawek -Amat or people called Tok Mae-Kong.
Ni-kuechi(Ni-Kari) or Tok Mae-Kong  Muen-sawek-Amat  married to Ni-Putih, a  relative of Ni-Bongsu- the royal guard of Phraya Saiburi(Ni-Pae), governor of Saiburi. Originally, Ni-Bongsu is resided in Nyiringa(Nyigno)but came  to live with the governor in Saiburi because of duty. Tok Mae-Kong Muen-sawek -Amat born one son to Ni-Putih, name Ni- Wae Ni-kuechi( later received royal title as Khun-Lahan Pracha-Chet)
Mean while Bangkok government had sent down Khunluang-Sukhumwinit as commissioner of Patani and had adopted a new collection of  opium and liquor tax by divided  percentage  of 50-50  between Patani and Bangkok, later he had collected land tax from people with out given any receipt, this in turn had given him an opportunity to collect land tax many times a year.
In 1900 the Siamese government had imposed the new collection system of  import and export tax in Patani by given  12.5 percent  of revenue received from the collection to Patani while another 77.5 percent was sent to Bangkok. The Patani Rajas opposed the new tax system of Siamese government by saying that the authority of tax collection was belong to them not Siamese government, the Patani Rajas feel uneasy with the situation and started to oppose the Siamese government, this led to an arrested of  Tengku Abd. Kadir Kamarudin, Patani Raja in the morning of Friday,  21 February 1902 by Phraya Sri Sahathep, deputy interior minister. After the arrest, Tengku Kamarudin Abd. Kadir was deported  to Songkhla and Pitsanulok respectively, he was charged with treason(disobeyed an order of Siamese King)  and sentenced to 3 years imprisonment in Pitsanulok.
Tengku Abd. Muttalib Raja of Saiburi
In March 18,1902  Khunluang-Sukhumwinit, the commissioner of Nakornsrithammarat arrested Tebgku Ngoh Shamsuddin, Raja of Legeh with 8 of his men and at the same time Tengku Abd. Muttalib, Raja of Saiburi was also arrested. The situation at the time was insecure for the royal family of Saiburi then they decided to send their family to take refuge in Kelantan.
Ni-Bongsu was one of the royal guard with 5 or 6 others had the order to protect  10  Saiburi royal family during travelling to take  refuge in Kelantan .
In this adventure, Ni-Bongsu had arrested Ni- Wae Ni-kuechi  son of Muen-Sawek-Amat as   the hostage because his father,  Muen-Sawek-Amat was a Siamese official and better known about the rout to Kelantan, Muen-Sawek-Amat had a lot of relative all  the way long  to Kelantan , starting from Legeh, Boango, Joh-Irong until Sungai Padi because he was originated from Baenu(Yaning ) village,  Joh-Irong. The Saiburi royal guards better known that with out his son in the company as hostage  there will be a negative threat to the security of Saiburi royal family.
Tengku Ngoh Shamsuddin Raja of Legeh
During the travelling  of Saiburi royal family to seek refuge in  Kelantan , they faced a lot of difficulties, they ate very simple food, slept in simple places,  sometimes people were  given food  to eat but people along the way pay much attention and respect when  they   knew that the company  belong to the royal family. At last the company reached  Tok Ra-Weng village situated  between Legeh and Kelantan and probably out Siamese government influence.
When reached Tok Ra-Weng village, Ni-Bongsu the chief of Royal guard had a serious sickness and had to stay at Tok Ra-Weng house for treatment,  Tok Ra-Weng was a man who migrated from Raweng village,(Jerang(Yarang), Patani) and establishing himself there.
Tok Ra-Weng village was a pier,  transporting merchandise to Tok Mo’  village(gold mine) thus had a bit of development. Ni-Bongsu was treated at Tok Ra-Weng house for many days but not yet better, the royal family then had decided to left him for further treatment at Tok Ra-Weng house and  they went further crossing the river to seek refuge in Kelantan.
After recover from sickness, Ni- Bongsu did  not travel to Kelantan to join the royal family there but established himself at this village by married  the woman in this village and born one son, Ni-Hae bin Ni-Bongsu.
Ni- Wae Ni-kuechi, the hostage of Saiburi royal family feel insecure  with out his close relative(Ni-Bongsu) joining the company of Saiburi royal family, in the night he escaped himself from the royal company,  until morning the Saiburi royal family knew the story of Ni- Wae Ni-kuechi but did not pay any interest to get him back because they were too tired and now they feel safe in Kelantan dominion. The royal company traveled further to Pasir Puteh village, Kelantan and established their family until this day and they never  come back again to Saiburi.
Patani Soldiers

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0 Statistic Summary of Conflict Incidences in southern Thailand(Patani) From 1-31 March 2014



From  Deep South Watch
(Translated from Thai Language)

Statistic of Death and Injured Persons classified according religion
Dead 35 Persons
Injured 38 persons
Not Specify
Buddhists
Muslims
Not Specify
Buddhists
Muslims

2

16

17

0

20

18



Statistic classified according to Type of Incidences
Type of Incidences
Number of Incidences
Grenade throwing
2
Spreading nails
1
Tyr  burning
1
Shooting
37
Shooting and Burn
2
Bombing
16
Bombing and Shooting
1
Total
60

Statistic classified according to Background(Occupation)
Occupation
Dead
Injured
Total
citizen
16
20
36
Police
3
7
10
Army
2
7
9
Para Military
1
1
2
Teacher/Education Personnel
2
0
2
Politician
1
0
1
Head Village/Headman /assist. Head village/man
3
1
4
Private employee
2
1
3
Islamic Religious Leaders
1
0
1
Foreigners
2
0
2
Youth age 15 down
0
1
1
Movement fighters
2
0
2
Total
35
38
73

Statistic classified according to Provinces in March 2014
Provinces
Incidences
Dead
Injured
Numbers
Percentage
Numbers
Percentage
Numbers
Percentage
Narathiwat
20
33.33
9
25.71
15
39.47
Pattani
23
38.33
17
48.57
17
44.74
Yala
15
25.00
9
25.71
6
15.79
Songkhla
2
3.33
0
0.00
0
0.00
Total
50
100.00
35
100.00
38
100.00
[Read More...]


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